Cove Fort, Utah

Written by on September 25, 2017 in UT History & Heritage - No comments

The Old West has been romanticized in story and song, movie and book … cowboys, good guys versus bad guys, heading west to make your fortune in gold and so much more. In truth, while the scenery is beyond compare, there really wasn’t much romantic about the West. For most people, it was a tough place to eke out a living. The land itself, the weather, the dirt and disease and even hostile Indian tribes combined forces to defeat so many.
covefort
In 1865 in Utah, the Black Hawk War started between the Native American tribes and the white settlers, most of whom were of the Mormon Church. In response to the danger, forts were erected all over the territory. Most are long gone, but one fort that stands today is Cove Fort. It was built in 1867 and became a refuge for many settlers as well as acting as a way station for travelers between Salt Lake City and the Mormon settlements in the Virgin River Valley. It had a telegraph office, a post office, and was a stopover point for many freighters and the stagecoach. Luckily, Cove Fort was never attacked by the Black Hawk Indians, but did serve as a vital nerve center for the area.

Today, Cove Fort is preserved as a museum by the Mormon Church. The walls of the fort form a square which is 100 feet on each side and are comprised mainly of black volcanic rock and dark limestone and are eighteen feet high. Parts of the original building have been restored and the bard and blacksmith shop have been re-created. It is a terrific place to learn more about how people truly lived in the West. The site is open daily and free guided tours are available. Reservations are suggested for groups of 20 or more. The fort is located immediately northeast of the junction of I-15 and I-70, 24 miles north of Beaver and 20 miles south of Kanosh, Utah.

Nearby attractions include:
Zion National Park
Bryce Canyon National Park
Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

Leave a Comment

Get Adobe Flash player